shutdowns

Google’s Exit From China May Cause Harsh Ramifications

Google China exit consequencesThis article will tell you about the Google China exit consequences. The complete details are given below.

Google has taken the hard step of shutting down operations of Google.cn and have rather decided to redirect Google.cn to their Hong Kong site, Google.com.hk

Since Google officials spoke about China’s censorship policies and literally gave an exit alarm, stirred by the alleged cyber attacks on Google along with other technology companies, there’s been a flurry of speculations by the media relating to the implications that Google’s move might cause.

Yesterday, Google officials spoke out once again and they have taken the hard step of shutting down operations of Google.cn and have rather decided to redirect Google.cn to their Hong Kong site, Google.com.hk. Google.com.hk is an uncensored version of Google in simple Chinese and Google believes that mainland chinese users should be able to access the uncensored results, provided Chinese government doesn’t block the access to the Google.com.hk or Google.cn completely.

Google, although shutting down its China search service, still wants to continue with the R&D work and sales presence in China for apparent reasons. But that’s really not the way Chinese government lets things happen in its territory.

According to the latest media reports, the retaliation from China has started already as China Telecom, China’s largest mobile communications company, has been directed(as reported by media) to remove Google as its search service. Likewise, China Unicom has supposedly paused the launch of an Android powered phone in China due to the ongoing tussle between Google and Chinese governance.

As Google is a company that has its presence in plenty of avenues, we’ve stacked together all those areas where Google is facing/may face rough treatment from Chinese authorities.

  1. YouTube, Google’s online video streaming service has already been blocked in China.
  2. Google sites and Blogger.com are also blocked in China.
  3. Google Groups, Picasa and Google Docs are partially blocked in China.
  4. Yet to launch Android powered Smartphones are likely to face Chinese’s scrutiny and may probably be averted from being sold at all.
  5. Google Web search and Mobile search have not faced the ultimate heat yet but it’s most likely that Chinese firewalls will soon block (either partial or complete) access to the uncensored Google search service.
  6. As Google wants to keep serving its Chinese advertisers through AdWords, Chinese authorities might simply avoid the access to Google AdWords, indirectly prohibiting Chinese advertisers from using the service and eventually making them give up by themselves.
  7. And if Iran can decide to block Gmail, the same can be expected from Chinese authorities as well. They might even block access to Gmail, especially when Gmail now includes Google Buzz, a social feature to share independent views and news with friends and other people.

Summing it up, Google’s exit may incur more much losses to itself than what it would have anticipated earlier. In simple words, Google may have simply lost China as its prospective market in any of the facets where Google has its presence. And now, things have gone far enough that Google just can’t take a reverse step and mind the gaps.

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Gerry Mattia

    March 24, 2010 at 1:11 am

    You have done a great service after a diservice to humanity. . . thank you Google. . . you are now the voice of so many who would have loved to live long enough for someone to hear their complaint. For you. . . I offer what you gave me. Apple came up with this years ago. . . I would have never seen it, if I wasn’t priviliged to peruse through the most amazing library you run. . .

    thank you Google

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jULUGHJCCj4

    • Prashant Sharma

      March 24, 2010 at 1:19 am

      @Gerry
      What you’re saying is somewhat true but Google may have to bear the heat all alone for taking this initiative against censorship and cyber attacks.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

To Top